"Health is very important. Remember exercise. Think back on times that you’ve moved, or expended energy. Also remember eating. Recall food, and what it was like. Remember sleep. Reminisce about rest. Drink plenty of water, but leave some water in case of fire."

Welcome to Night Vale (Mayor Pamela Winchell)

Episode 42 - Numbers

(via nightvalequotes)

03/11/2014
02:15 PM
Permalink 309 notes
Comments

huuuuuuuup:

BIG BIG HUUUUUUP :)

Valerie Inertie in collaboration with Stephan Braun.

03/07/2014
07:28 PM
Permalink 805 notes
Comments

02/17/2014
12:52 PM
Permalink 29,651 notes
Comments

"Most importantly, all of us, all of us here in Night Vale, in America, in the world, in the secret orbital bases, all of us got through another day. We passed the time from one end of 12 to the other without stopping once. Well done, us! Good job, people who experience time! Time-experiencers, good job!"

- Welcome to Night Vale, Episode 7, “History Week”

This was strangely uplifting.

(via electricshoebox)

(via theshapefromgrovepark)

02/13/2014
03:35 PM
Permalink 290 notes
Comments

"Night Vale is an ancient place, full of history and secrets, as we were reminded today. But it is also a place of the present moment, full of life, and of us. If you can hear my voice, speaking live, then you know: We are not history yet. We are happening now. How miraculous is that?"

Welcome to Night Vale

Episode 4 - PTA Meeting

(via nightvalequotes)

02/13/2014
12:09 PM
Permalink 301 notes
Comments

privilege614:

We couldn’t find the lifestyle we wanted [in Columbus] so we made our own. We started Privilege. Privilege allows us to be ourselves around the people who understand and accept us the way we are. We are everyday people with dreams and aspirations. We are creators, leaders, enthusiasts, socialists, extroverts, introverts, who absorb and exert good and positive energy. We remain exclusive to stay true to the lifestyle. Once Privileged you have the option to determine another as Privileged. We have every intention to expand our social fellowship so with that….stay tuned for more about Privilege…

Be you. Be Privileged.

2.7.14 10pm. Be Privileged.

Location will be released to the Privileged.

Will there be Snake Juice? Judging by how ridiculous this all is, I assume this social experience is affiliated with the Sapersteins?

TREAT YO SELF

02/11/2014
03:40 PM
Permalink 3 notes
Comments

lets-get-fit-madafaka:

arthlete:

Truth! But only if you ‘work hard’ in the kitchen too!

Like they say “Fitness is like marriage: you cant cheat and expect it to work”

lets-get-fit-madafaka:

arthlete:

Truth! But only if you ‘work hard’ in the kitchen too!

Like they say “Fitness is like marriage: you cant cheat and expect it to work”

(via butterfly-metamorphosis)

02/06/2014
04:08 PM
Permalink 4,954 notes
Comments

3rdperiodpoints:

lumberjack:

The list of Andy Dwyer’s band names from the writer’s room of Parks & Recreation.

At the noon hour, as modern man is wont to do, I find myself cantering through the connected tubes that make up our Internet. What do I find, you ask? I find a band calling itself Sex Beet. Naturally, (for obvious reasons) I suspect that this curious Sex Beet must be a side project of Andy Dwyer, frontman of Pawnee, Indiana’s favorite band, Mouse Rat (formerly Scarecrow Boat.) No such luck, my friends. No such luck. For now, we shall have to make do with the above list of Mr. Dwyer’s band names.
Remember: All of us—even a Sex Beet, a Mule Pony, or SpongeRobert Rhombus Pantaloons—fall into the pit. What truly matters is the songs we play after we’re rescued by Medevac and given months to properly heal.
http://www.scarecrowboat.com/downloads/The_Pit.mp3

3rdperiodpoints:

lumberjack:

The list of Andy Dwyer’s band names from the writer’s room of Parks & Recreation.

At the noon hour, as modern man is wont to do, I find myself cantering through the connected tubes that make up our Internet. What do I find, you ask? I find a band calling itself Sex Beet. Naturally, (for obvious reasons) I suspect that this curious Sex Beet must be a side project of Andy Dwyer, frontman of Pawnee, Indiana’s favorite band, Mouse Rat (formerly Scarecrow Boat.) No such luck, my friends. No such luck. For now, we shall have to make do with the above list of Mr. Dwyer’s band names.

Remember: All of us—even a Sex Beet, a Mule Pony, or SpongeRobert Rhombus Pantaloons—fall into the pit. What truly matters is the songs we play after we’re rescued by Medevac and given months to properly heal.

http://www.scarecrowboat.com/downloads/The_Pit.mp3

02/03/2014
11:31 PM
Permalink 564 notes
Comments

cannelledusoleil:

DIY budget jars - hopefully these will help me keep track of my spending better!
And yes, I did spend my Saturday night crafting and coming up with a more practical budgeting system for myself.

I LOVE these little jars. Great idea.

cannelledusoleil:

DIY budget jars - hopefully these will help me keep track of my spending better!

And yes, I did spend my Saturday night crafting and coming up with a more practical budgeting system for myself.

I LOVE these little jars. Great idea.

(via unfuckyourhabitat)

12/02/2013
04:57 PM
Permalink 174 notes
Comments

To read later when I have time:

propaganda-for-life:

This is a long read, so I’m only going to post the beginning of it. Thanks, samanthatoren.

————

Margaret Sanger gained worldwide renown, respect, and admiration for founding the American birth control movement and, later, the Planned Parenthood Federation of America, as well as for developing and encouraging family planning efforts throughout the international community.
Among her many visionary accomplishments as a social reformer, Sanger

• established the principles that a woman’s right to control her body is the foundation of her human rights; that every person should be able to decide when or whether to have a child; that every child should be wanted and loved; and that women are entitled to sexual pleasure and fulfillment just as men are

• brought about the reversal of federal and state “Comstock laws” that prohibited publication and distribution of information about sex, sexuality, contraception, and human reproduction

• helped establish the contemporary American model for the protection of civil rights through nonviolent civil disobedience — a model that later propelled the civil rights, anti-war, women’s rights, and AIDS-action movements

• created access to birth control for low-income, minority, and immigrant women

• expanded the American concept of volunteerism and grassroots organizing by setting up a network of volunteer-driven family planning centers across the U.S.

Sanger also entertained some popular ideas of her own time that are out of keeping with our thinking today. Finding it easier to undermine her character than to confront the message she conveyed, the anti-family planning movement has seized upon some of these ideas, taken them out of context, and exaggerated and distorted them in order to discredit Sanger and the organization she founded.
Not content with exaggeration and distortion, anti-choice activists have also fabricated and attributed to Sanger points of view that she, in fact, found abhorrent. This fact sheet is designed to separate fact from fiction and to further explain Sanger’s views and the background against which they must be judged.

Sanger and Eugenics

Eugenics is the science of improving hereditary qualities by socially controlling human reproduction. Unable to foment popular opposition to Margaret Sanger’s accomplishments and the organization she founded, Sanger’s critics attempt to discredit them by intentionally confusing her views on “fitness” with eugenics, racism, and anti-Semitism. Margaret Sanger was not a racist, an anti-Semite, or a eugenicist. Eugenicists, like the Nazis, were opposed to the use of abortion and contraception by healthy and “fit” women (Grossmann, 1995). In fact, Sanger’s books were among the very first burned by the Nazis in their campaign against family planning (“Sanger on Exhibit,” 1999/2000). Sanger actually helped several Jewish women and men and others escape the Nazi regime in Germany (“Margaret Sanger and the ‘Refugee Department’,” 1993). Sanger’s disagreement with the eugenicists of her day is clear from her remarks in The Birth Control Review of February 1919:

Eugenists imply or insist that a woman’s first duty is to the state; we contend that her duty to herself is her first duty to the state. We maintain that a woman possessing an adequate knowledge of her reproductive functions is the best judge of the time and conditions under which her child should be brought into the world. We further maintain that it is her right, regardless of all other considerations, to determine whether she shall bear children or not, and how many children she shall bear if she chooses to become a mother (1919a).

Margaret Sanger clearly identified with the issues of health and fitness that concerned the early 20th-century eugenics movement, which was enormously popular and well-respected during the 1920s and ’30s, when treatments for many hereditary and disabling conditions were unknown. However, Sanger always believed that reproductive decisions should be made on an individual and not a social or cultural basis, and she consistently repudiated any racial application of eugenics principles. For example, Sanger vocally opposed the racial stereotyping that effected passage of the Immigration Act of 1924, on the grounds that intelligence and other inherited traits vary by individual and not by group.

In 1927, the eugenics movement reached the height of its popularity when the U.S. Supreme Court, in Buck v. Bell, held that it was constitutional to involuntarily sterilize the developmentally disabled, the insane, or the uncontrollably epileptic. Oliver Wendell Holmes, supported by Louis Brandeis and six other justices, wrote the opinion.

Although Sanger uniformly repudiated the racist exploitation of eugenics principles, she agreed with the “progressives” of her day who favored

• incentives for the voluntary hospitalization and/or sterilization of people with untreatable, disabling, hereditary conditions

• the adoption and enforcement of stringent regulations to prevent the immigration of the diseased and “feebleminded” into the U.S.

• placing so-called illiterates, paupers, unemployables, criminals, prostitutes, and dope-fiends on farms and open spaces as long as necessary for the strengthening and development of moral conduct

Planned Parenthood Federation of America finds these views objectionable and outmoded. Nevertheless, anti-family planning activists continue to attack Sanger, who has been dead for over 30 years, because she is an easier target than the unassailable reputation of PPFA and the contemporary family planning movement. However, attempts to discredit the family planning movement because its early 20th-century founder was not a perfect model of early 21st-century values is like disavowing the Declaration of Independence because its author, Thomas Jefferson, bought and sold slaves.

Sanger’s Outreach to the African-American Community

In 1930, Sanger opened a family planning clinic in Harlem that sought to enlist support for contraceptive use and to bring the benefits of family planning to women who were denied access to their city’s health and social services. Staffed by a black physician and black social worker, the clinic was endorsed by The Amsterdam News (the powerful local newspaper), the Abyssinian Baptist Church, the Urban League, and the black community’s elder statesman, W.E.B. DuBois.

Beginning in 1939, DuBois also served on the advisory council for Sanger’s “Negro Project,” which was a “unique experiment in race-building and humanitarian service to a race subjected to discrimination, hardship, and segregation” (Chesler, 1992). The Negro Project served African-Americans in the rural South. Other leaders of the African-American community who were involved in the project included Mary McLeod Bethune, founder of the National Council of Negro Women, and Adam Clayton Powell Jr., pastor of the Abyssinian Baptist Church in Harlem.

10/16/2013
02:36 PM
Permalink 50 notes
Comments